Research Collaborations

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Collaborations with Industry

Organocatalyzed controlled radical polymerization as polymer design platform
Associate Professor Atsushi Goto from the School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and his team have developed organocatalyzed controlled radical polymerization (OCRP) as a new technique for synthesizing high-value polymer products. OCRP is metal-free, odor-free, and cost-effective, and hence is already commercially used for manufacturing printer inks in tons of scale. His team is currently collaborating with several industrial partners for different product areas. Nippon Shokubai, a leading global chemical company from Japan, sends two researchers to NTU for research collaboration in biomedical applications such as drug delivery. High-value synthetic polymer is a gigantic market encompassing healthcare, homecare, water, oil, energy, and agrochemical products. We are seeking to expand industrial relevance.
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Key Features and Innovation
  • Metal-free & Odor-free
  • Low-cost manufacturing process
  • A range of polymer structures using various monomers
 
Potential Application
 
  • High-value synthetic polymer products
Relevance to which Industry
  • Healthcare, homecare, biomedical, and cosmetics
  • Water treatment, oilfield, and lubrication
  • Agrochemicals, adhensives, coatings, paints, inks, surfactants, elastomers, and plastics
 
 
Voltage Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy in Spintronics Devices

As Moore’s law push the size of memory devices to their physical limits, Spintronic devices allow additional utilities such as enhancing endurance, lowering energy consumption and non-volatility. These magnetic devices use the spin of the electron to read, write and store memory. As current driving methods such as spin transfer torque requires higher power consumption which in turn causes joule heating, voltage controlled magnetic anisotropy (VCMA) can improve energy dissipation by 100 times. In recent years, VCMA has gathered interest and has shown its capabilities to either write or drive spintronic devices such as magnetic tunnel junction, domain wall memory and magnetic Skyrmion. This project is led by Associate Professor Lew Wen Siang from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences with collaboration from GLOBALFOUNDRIES Singapore is to achieve high speed spintronic devices by utilizing the VCMA effect. 
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Figure 1. Magnetic tunnel junction under opposite applied voltage, the white arrows show the magnetic easy axis of the material
 
Key Features and Innovation
·         New generation of ultra low-power non-volatile spintronic devices
·         High energy efficiency of spintronic devices and enhanced performance of magnetic memories
 
Potential Application
·         Dynamic random access memory (DRAM) replacement
·         STT- magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM) replacement
 
Relevance to which Industry
·         Semiconductor
·         Micro- and Nano-electronics
·         Spintronics
 
 
 
Voltage Controlled Magnetic Anisotropy measurement on a Hall cross device
 
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Novel high anisotropy PMA materials for STT-MRAM applications
In order to keep up with the trend set by Moore’s law, the rapid advancement and reliance on smaller and faster electronics have led to the development of new technologies such as magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM). The core element to enable fast switching and non-volatility seen in MRAM is a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ), which in its rudimentary form consists of two ferromagnetic elements sandwiching a dielectric barrier. Amongst various other physical, magnetic and electrical requirements, the MTJ must also be able to withstand 400°C annealing temperature found in matured CMOS back-end-of-line (BEOL) technology, as well as a minimum thermal stability for 10 year data retention capability.
At NTU Spintronics lab, Associate Professor Lew Wen Siang from School of Physical and Mathematical Sciences and his team work closely with GLOBALFOUNDRIES through various project initiatives to improve on the various aspects of the MRAM fabrication processes, such as etch method evaluation, micromagnetics simulation and novel switching mechanism. In this project, they focus on evaluating novel materials that can be implemented in the current stack design to solve the above challenges, as well as the characterization of the core element of the MRAM device by probing the magnetization dynamics of the system.
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Figure 1. Ferromagnetic resonance spectrometer (FMR) contrast plot profile used to individually identify the anisotropy strengths of the free layer and reference layer in the MTJ.
 

Key Features and Innovation
·         Magnetization dynamics study of magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ)
·         Thermally robust MTJ for back-end-of-line (BEOL) integration
 
Potential Application
 
·         STT- magnetoresistive random access memory (MRAM)
·         Spin diode
Relevance to which Industry
·         Semiconductor
·         Micro- and Nano-electronics
·         Spintronics
 
 
High stability, integrated and automated ferromagnetic resonance spectrometer (FMR) system
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